OST Blog

Why do wisdom teeth need to be removed?

July 8th, 2020

Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter and our team at Oral Surgery of Tidewater get this question a lot. Wisdom teeth are the last teeth to come in, once young people get their adult teeth. Because they are the last teeth to break through the gums, they are often called the third molars. There are four wisdom teeth: two on each side of the top and bottom of the mouth.

There is no hard-and-fast rule that says everyone must have the wisdom teeth removed. There are certain situations in which they either cause problems directly, or create a situation where there is a greater likelihood problems will arise eventually.

Impacted wisdom teeth

If Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter and our team say you have a soft tissue impaction, it means your wisdom tooth is covered by gum tissue that is preventing it from erupting — most likely because your mouth is too small to provide the tooth with the room it needs to emerge.

The term “partial bony impaction” means that gum tissue is covering the wisdom tooth, but part of the jaw bone is also covering it, in which case there is no room in your mouth for the tooth to erupt. The opposite end of this spectrum is a complete bony impaction, where the wisdom tooth is completely covered by gum tissue and the jawbone, which prevent it from ever erupting.

The importance of removing impacted wisdom teeth

Dentists often want to remove impacted wisdom teeth because of the likelihood that they will cause problems, or because a problem already exists. One such problem is pericoronitis, an acute abscess that affects partially impacted wisdom teeth. Food, bacteria, and other mouth debris can become lodged under the gum flap that covers the wisdom tooth, which prevents it from erupting. Pericoronitis symptoms include pain, swelling, and the presence of an abscess.

Regular dental checkups will enable your dentist to keep an eye on your wisdom teeth, especially if they have some type of impaction. Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter and our team at Oral Surgery of Tidewater typically recommend removal of impacted wisdom teeth because of the likelihood that severe infections such as pericoronitis will develop.

If you have any questions about wisdom teeth, or if you would like to schedule an appointment with Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter, please give us a call at our convenient Virginia Beach, VA office!

Fun Facts for the Fourth

July 1st, 2020

The Fourth of July is a great time to get together with friends and family members for BBQ, games, fireworks, and other celebrations in honor of our country’s independence. While your fellow revelers eat hot dogs and wave flags, you can impress them by sharing these fascinating facts and historical tidbits about some of our country’s traditions and symbols from the team at Oral Surgery of Tidewater.

The Statue of Liberty

With a torch in one hand and a tablet in the other, the Statue of Liberty is one of the most iconic and recognizable symbols of our country. However, as recognizable as certain parts of the statue are, not many people know that broken shackles, which represent oppression and tyranny, are lying at Lady Liberty’s feet. According to the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, the copper-plated lady weighs in at a whopping 450,000 tons and has been holding her torch up for more than 125 years, which must make for some impressive arm muscles.

Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest

Since 1916, people have been flocking to Coney Island on the Fourth of July to witness what some people call the “superbowl of competitive eating.” Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating contest challenges competitors to devour as many hot dogs as they can in just ten minutes, with the current record holder swallowing a whopping 68 hot dogs! If you’d like to witness this bizarre and frenzied eating competition but you won’t be anywhere near Coney Island on the fourth, don’t worry. ESPN has been broadcasting this popular event for several years, so you can watch from the comfort of your couch while you eat a reasonably portioned meal.

The History Behind Fireworks

Viewing the nighttime fireworks display is exciting way to finish off the fourth. Many people know that these brilliant displays probably originated with the Chinese. However, many historians also believe that fireworks were stumbled upon when the Chinese roasted bamboo sticks over fires and watched them explode. After many years of roasting the sticks, a group of alchemists created an early form of gunpowder, which they stuffed into the bamboo sticks to create an even more powerful explosion, paving the way for the today’s modern fireworks.

Whether you’re planning on visiting the Statue of Liberty, watching fireworks in Virginia Beach, VA, or even participating in a hot dog eating contest, Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter and our team hope you have a safe and fun-filled holiday. Happy Fourth of July!

Diet Soda vs. Regular Soda: Which is better for teeth?

June 17th, 2020

When most patients ask Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter this question, they're thinking strictly about sugar content — cut out the bacteria-feeding sugar that's present in regular soda by opting for a diet soda and it will be better for your teeth. That seems logical, right? Well, there's a bit more to it than that. Let's take a closer look at how any kind of soda can affect your dental health.

Diet Soda – Why it can also lead to tooth decay

The main culprit in these drinks that leads to decay is the acid content. Diet sodas and other sugar-free drinks are usually highly acidic, which weakens the enamel on your teeth and makes them more susceptible to cavities and dental erosion. The level of phosphoric acid, citric acid, and/or tartaric acid is usually high in sugar-free drinks so it's best to avoid them.

Some patients also enjoy drinking orange juice or other citrus juices. These drinks are high in citric acid and have the same effect on the enamel of your teeth.

So what about regular soda?

We know the acidity of diet sodas and sugar-free drinks contributes to tooth decay, so what about regular soda? Like we alluded to earlier, regular soda is high in sugar — a 12 ounce can contains roughly ten teaspoons of sugar — and sugar feeds the decay-causing bacteria in the mouth. This also includes sports drinks and energy drinks, which are highly acidic and loaded with sugar too. So these drinks are a double-whammy of sugar and acidity your teeth and body simply don't need.

The problems caused by both diet and regular soda is exacerbated when you sip on them throughout the day. If you drink it all in one sitting, you won't be washing sugar and/or acids over your teeth all day long and your saliva will have a chance to neutralize the pH in your mouth.

The best beverages to drink and how to drink them

Drinking beverages that are lower in acid is a good step to take to keep your enamel strong. According to a study conducted by Matthew M. Rodgers and J. Anthony von Fraunhofer at the University of Michigan, your best bets are plain water, black tea or coffee, and if you opt for a soda, root beer. These drinks dissolved the least amount of enamel when measured 14 days after consumption of the beverage.

If you still choose to drink soda, diet soda, sugar-free drinks, or juices here are some other tips to lessen tooth decay:

  • Drink your soda or acidic beverages through a straw to minimize contact with teeth
  • Rinse with water immediately after consumption of the beverage
  • Avoid brushing your teeth between 30 minutes to an hour after drinking the beverage as this has been shown to spread the acids before your saliva can bring your mouth back to a neutral pH
  • Avoid drinks that have acids listed on the ingredients label

Still have questions about soda, sugar, and acid? Give our Virginia Beach, VA office a call and we’d be happy to help!

Oral Surgery: Is There a Dress Code?

June 10th, 2020

If you’re scheduled for oral surgery at our Virginia Beach, VA office in the near future, you probably have a lot of very important questions:

  • Will it help? Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon has the skill and experience to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the face, mouth, and jaw with a number of different surgical procedures. Oral surgeons are the experts in these surgical specialties, so you are in good hands!
  • Will it hurt? Your oral surgeon has been trained in all types of anesthesiology, so you can choose the sedation experience which will make you most comfortable.
  • What should I do after surgery? Don’t worry! Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter will give you clear instructions on caring for the surgical site, selecting soothing diet options, cleaning your mouth, and all of the other practices that will enable a speedy and smooth recovery.
  • What should I wear? Wait—fashion questions?

Yes! Part of being prepared for your surgery is being as comfortable as you can be during and after the procedure. Happily, there is no strict oral surgery dress code. It’s more a basic list of recommendations for what not to wear.

  • Don’t wear something you’re not comfortable in. Generally, loose fitting clothing is best.
  • Don’t wear clothing that might be difficult to clean. While you and your clothing will be well protected, blood, irrigation, and other staining hazards are all occasionally part of the surgical process.
  • Don’t wear something that will be difficult to remove after surgery. No one wants to struggle out of a tight turtleneck even at the best of times!
  • Don’t wear jewelry. And, by the way, this includes tongue and facial piercings.
  • Don’t be afraid to layer. While the office staff will try to make sure you are as warm or as cool as you would like to be, it’s a good idea to bring a jacket or sweater for extra warmth.
  • Don’t wear tight sleeves. Short sleeves or sleeves that can be rolled up easily allow access to your arm if you are having IV sedation or blood pressure monitoring.
  • Don’t wear contact lenses, especially if you are planning on IV sedation or a general anesthetic, because your eyes might be closed throughout the procedure.

If you have any questions in advance of your oral surgery, give our Virginia Beach, VA office a call. Planning ahead is always in fashion!

2875 Sabre St #260
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 499-6886

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