OST Blog

Alleviating Anxiety before Your Implant Procedure

September 23rd, 2020

Does the thought of getting a dental implant put knots in your stomach? There are many people who don't enjoy getting dental work done and there is a myriad of reasons why. For whatever reason you aren't at your best when you arrive at our Virginia Beach, VA office, we'd like to offer some tips that can help put you at ease for your implant procedure.

Sedation

For lengthy visits like an implant procedure, sedation dentistry may be an option for you. With sedation dentistry you are given sedation medication, usually orally with a pill or intravenously, which allows you to drift through the entire procedure without any memory of it afterward. If you decide on oral sedation, typically you take the medication about an hour before your procedure starts.

To avoid any complications, a complete medical background check is made along with a record of any allergies before any sedation is administered. Your vital signs are also monitored throughout the entire procedure.

If you decide sedation is not the right option for you, there are other techniques that you can benefit from. Some of these include:

  • Communication: This may seem obvious, but communicating any fears or anxiety you may have about your procedure with us is extremely helpful. Not only does this build a relationship of trust but it allows us to try and alleviate your anxiety as much as we can.
  • Herbal teas: Drink some herbal tea (like chamomile or lemon balm) before you visit the office. Many patients find this is a great help in relieving anxiety and putting them sufficiently at ease.
  • Relaxing music: Bring a pair of headphones along and listen to your favorite music during treatment (preferably something low-key). Or why not catch up on your reading when you visit us — some patients like to listen to audiobooks too!
  • Meditate or practice deep breathing: Meditation and deep breathing are good to practice in general, since they relax both the body and mind. They can be effective in the case of anxiety, too!

Top Five Ways to Improve Heart Health

September 16th, 2020

While there is no definite evidence that if your prevent gum diseases, like periodontitis, that you may be able to prevent a heart condition or heart disease. The only thing experts, like Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter, know for sure is that if you take care of your gums it can lessen atherosclerosis, (build-up of artery clogging plaque) that may result in a heart attack or stroke.

Could periodontal disease cause heart attacks?

Regardless of your oral health, if you're at a high risk for heart disease, you need to take action.

  • Maintain a healthy weight or lose weight.
  • Consume healthy foods and beverages.
  • Exercise several days the week. Walking is a powerful and lightweight exercise and will clear your head while helping your body get or stay healthy.
  • Control any medical conditions you may have such as high cholesterol, diabetes, or high blood pressure.
  • Reduce your stress. Have lunch with a friend, go for a walk in the park, take a bubble bath, mediate, or do whatever you find relaxing.
  • Get a social life. Laughing reduces stress and “feel good” hormones. Everyone needs to feel like they are a part of something: join a book club or any activity where you can interact with other people at least once or twice a week
  • Be sure to get enough sleep. The recommended amount is eight to nine hours a night. It has been proven that a lack of sleep increases your risk for angina, strokes, and heart attacks.
  • Practice good oral hygiene to keep bacteria in check and your mouth healthy.

Contact our Virginia Beach, VA office if you have questions about your heart and oral health. If you take practice good oral hygiene, both your mouth and your heart will thank you.

Is a Lost Tooth a Lost Cause?

September 9th, 2020

We’re used to seeing athletes wearing mouthguards at practice or play, because dental trauma is one of the most common (and predictable) sports injuries. But it’s not just athletes who are at risk, and there are some events in our daily lives that we just can’t predict. Car accidents, falls, workplace injuries, even innocent playground structures can take their toll on our smiles.

A major chip or a crack in your tooth is upsetting enough, and should be seen by a dentist as soon as possible. It’s even more unnerving when a tooth is knocked out completely. The technical term for a tooth which has been knocked out is an avulsed tooth, and it is a true dental emergency.

If you should suffer a partially or completely dislodged tooth, there is a possibility that your tooth can be reimplanted—if the damage isn’t too severe and if you get to your oral surgeon or dentist immediately.

How can a lost tooth be saved? This is possible because of the complex biological engineering that anchors our teeth within the jaw. The root of a tooth is surrounded by the periodontal ligament. This connective tissue attaches the tooth to the alveolar bone of the jaw. When a tooth is knocked out, this ligament splits apart, leaving some tissue on the tooth root and some within the tooth’s socket.

To successfully reimplant a tooth, the connective tissue cells around the root of the tooth need to be vital, so that they can begin to reattach to the connective tissue left in the socket. Over time, this reattachment is complete, and the tooth becomes firmly anchored to the bone again.

It’s important to protect your tooth before you see Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter to make sure there will be enough healthy tissue for reattachment. First of all,

  • Don’t panic! If you or a friend or family member lose a tooth, call your oral surgeon, your dentist, or your emergency health care provider as soon as possible. You will get specific instructions for your specific situation.

If you are unable to reach your health care provider immediately, there are some general rules for taking care of an avulsed tooth:

  • Find the lost tooth. Don’t touch the root—use the crown, or top part of the tooth, to pick it up. You are trying to preserve and protect the connective tissue on the root surface.

 

  • If the tooth is dirty, gently rinse it in milk, saliva, or water. Don’t wipe it off, though. You could damage those connective tissue cells mentioned above.

 

  • Place the tooth back in the socket, if possible. Gently hold it in place with your fingers or bite down (again, gently). You can also place the tooth in your mouth next to your cheek.

 

  • If returning the tooth to the socket is not an option, or if you are worried about a child possibly swallowing the tooth, keep the tooth moist. Whole milk or solutions sold just for the purpose of preserving an avulsed tooth are better choices than water, which damage the tissue cells on the root. And never wrap the tooth tightly—this can also damage the connective tissue.

Above all,

  • Don’t delay! The faster a tooth is reimplanted in its socket, the greater chance you have of keeping it. Really, every minute counts. Reimplantations are more successful if they take place within 30 minutes. After an hour out of the mouth, your tooth’s chances of successful reintegration are lower—but still worth pursuing!

What will your oral surgeon do?

  • Evaluate the avulsed tooth.

There are variables which can affect whether or not a lost tooth is a good candidate for reimplantation. Trying to replace a baby tooth, for example, could interfere with the formation of the adult tooth. An adult tooth that is broken will probably require a different type of treatment.

  • Prevent infection.

You might be given antibiotics and a referral to your doctor for a tetanus booster if needed.

  • Clean the site.

The socket will be gently irrigated to clean the area and to remove any clots that may have formed which can interfere with the tooth’s placement.

  • Recommend or perform a root canal.

Nerves and blood vessels within the tooth’s pulp generally don’t recover after a serious traumatic injury, so a root canal procedure could be necessary to preserve the health of your tooth. This procedure might be done immediately, or might be recommended for a later date.

  • Stabilize your tooth.

The tooth must be stabilized after being reimplanted, so Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter will use a splint to anchor the tooth to the teeth next to it. The splint can be flexible or rigid, depending on the condition of the alveolar bone. Splinting generally takes from two to eight weeks, and you will be given detailed instructions for taking care of the area while you heal.

Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter can offer you your best options for successful treatment because oral and maxillofacial surgeons are experienced in treating not only avulsed teeth, but dental trauma in the surrounding area as well. Losing a tooth is an alarming experience. But with prompt action, and a trip to our Virginia Beach, VA office, it might be possible to make that loss only a temporary one.

Pain after Root Canal? Perhaps an Apicoectomy Is the Answer

August 26th, 2020

Happily, a root canal is usually all that you need to treat an infection in your inner tooth. But when inflammation or infection returns at the tip of the root, or in the bone surrounding the tip, your dentist may recommend that you see an oral and maxillofacial surgeon like Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter for further diagnosis and treatment.

And often when pain, inflammation, or infection recur after a root canal, we may suggest an apicoectomy—a procedure that can save your natural tooth and prevent further infection or damage to the neighboring bone and teeth.

  • Just what is an apicoectomy?

The tip of a root is also called its “apex.” An apicoectomy means the surgical removal (“ectomy”) of the apex (“apico”) of a tooth’s root.

  • How does the procedure work?

Often local anesthesia is all that is needed. (But if you have concerns, talk to us about your anesthesia and sedation options. We are expert in all forms of anesthesia.)

After the area is numb, an incision is made in the gum tissue to allow access to the root and any affected bone tissue.

Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter will carefully remove the tip of the root and any damaged or infected tissue from the bone surrounding it. The root end will then be cleaned and sealed.

Stitches or sutures will be used to close the incision, which will either dissolve on their own or which will be removed on a follow-up visit. We will let you know just how to take care of the site after surgery.

In general, any pain or sensitivity after the procedure can be treated with over-the-counter anti-inflammatory pain relief such as ibuprofen. Patients should follow post-op instructions carefully to reduce any swelling, and be sure to follow any dietary suggestions and restrictions.

  • Why choose an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for your apicoectomy?

An oral and maxillofacial surgeon has the training and skill to perform this specialized procedure. After dental school, oral surgeons pursue four to six years of additional advanced medical studies at a residency-based hospital.

They train with medical residents in the fields of anesthesiology, general surgery, internal medicine, and other surgical areas, concentrating on the bone, skin, and muscle of the face and jaw. They are uniquely qualified to diagnose and treat oral conditions that require a surgical solution, and routinely perform procedures such as apicoectomies.

Happily, a root canal is usually all that you need to treat an infection in your inner tooth. But if you have recurring or new pain or infection after a root canal, and if you want to preserve your natural tooth, an apicoectomy at our Virginia Beach, VA office is an option well worth investigating.

2875 Sabre St #260
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 499-6886

Please Call for our Extended Hours!


Mon:Closed
tue:8:00 am - 5:00 pm
wed:8:00 am - 5:00 pm
thu:8:00 am - 5:00 pm
fri:8:00 am - 5:00 pm