OST Blog

Suffer from Dental Anxiety? Not a Problem.

October 14th, 2019

If you suffer from dental anxiety, we understand that paying a visit to our office can seem like a nearly impossible mission. Regardless of what the root of that anxiety might be, we’re here to tell you that at Oral Surgery of Tidewater, you have no need to be nervous. Our office is dedicated to making your dental experience as comfortable and stress-free as possible.

One of the best things to do if you experience dental anxiety is call our office in advance to let us know. By notifying us in advance, you give us the opportunity to provide you with the dental care you need in the way you need it.

We can prescribe a relaxation medication for you. During your appointment, we can provide a little bit of laughing gas to put you more at ease, teach you some behavioral techniques for relaxation, and make sure you’re never in the dark about what’s happening.

If dental anxiety makes you feel embarrassed, please be assured that you’re not alone. Studies show that as much as 75% of adults suffer some degree of dental anxiety! It might be helpful to remember that your doctor’s goal is the same as yours: We are here to keep your oral health in check so you can be your healthiest self. We certainly don’t want to make you uncomfortable in the process.

If you have any questions about other ways in which we can accommodate you during your visits, please don’t hesitate to contact our Virginia Beach, VA office!

What's on your fall reading list?

October 7th, 2019

How better to spend the fall months than inside by the fireplace with a warm cup of cider and a book in hand? Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter and our team at Oral Surgery of Tidewater encourage you to warm up your mind this fall season with a few great books. Sure it may be easy to put off reading when balancing a hectic schedule, but reading is vital to brain development. Besides, reading is always a blast!

This week, we thought we’d ask what you or your child are reading this fall. Do you have any suggestions for must-read books this year? Out of ideas for great fall reads? Ask us for suggestions, and we would be happy to provide a few. You may also ask a local librarian here in Virginia Beach, VA for some ideas.

Happy reading! Be sure to share with us your fall picks or your all-time favorites below or on our Facebook page!

Aging and Oral Health

September 30th, 2019

As you age, it becomes even more important to take good care of your teeth and dental health. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one-fourth of adults age 65 and older have no remaining teeth. What's more, nearly one-third of older adults have untreated tooth decay.

Oral health, regardless of age, is crucial to overall good health. Ideally, we all want to keep your natural teeth, but whether you're caring for natural teeth or dentures, advancing age may put older adults at risk for a number of oral health problems, including:

  • Dry mouth
  • Diminished sense of taste
  • Root decay
  • Gum disease
  • Uneven jawbone caused by tooth loss
  • Denture-induced tissue inflammation
  • Overgrowth of fungus in the mouth
  • Attrition (loss of teeth structure by mechanical forces)
  • Oral cancer

These conditions may not be diagnosed until it is too late. If you want to feel good, stay healthy, and look great throughout life, you might be surprised what a difference a healthy mouth makes.

Here are some tips for maintaining and improving your oral health as you become older:

  • Brush twice a day with a toothbrush with soft bristles. You may also benefit from using an electric toothbrush.
  • Clean between your teeth once a day with floss or another interdental cleaner.
  • If you wear full or partial dentures, remember to clean them on a daily basis. Take your dentures out of your mouth for at least four hours every day. It’s best to remove them at night.
  • Drink tap water. Since most contains fluoride, it helps prevent tooth decay no matter how old you are.
  • Quit smoking. Besides putting you at greater risk for lung and other cancers, smoking increases problems with gum disease, tooth decay, and tooth loss.
  • Visit Oral Surgery of Tidewater regularly for a complete dental checkup.

If you have any questions about keeping up with your oral hygiene at home, please give us a call!

Prevent Dry Socket after Oral Surgery

September 23rd, 2019

When you have a tooth extracted, your body immediately sets to work to help protect the affected area. The blood that collects at the site of the extraction clots to cover and protect the wound. This is a normal response, and protects the nerves and bone that have been exposed with the removal of your tooth. Normally, the gum tissue will close over the area within a few weeks.

But sometimes the clot becomes dislodged or dissolved before you have a chance to heal. This condition is known as “alveolar osteitis,” or dry socket. Sensitive nerves and bone in the extraction site are exposed to air and outside substances causing intense pain. Bacteria and food particles can also contaminate the wound and lead to pain and infection in the area around the socket.

There are certain activities that should definitely be avoided to reduce the risk of dry socket.

  • Straws and suction

The action of using a straw causes suction that can dislodge the clot. You can still enjoy the soothing coolness of a milkshake, but use a spoon.

  • Spitting

You might be tempted to rinse and spit immediately to clean your mouth, but spitting can also dislodge the clot. We will let you know how to clean your mouth and teeth for the next few days.

  • Smoking

Not only does smoking provide a suction effect that can remove the clot, but smoking and chewing tobacco can slow healing as well.

There are also steps you can take to aid the healing process.

  • Caring for your extraction site

We’ll give you instructions on caring for your mouth and teeth for the next few days. Gentle care for the extraction site is vital. And treat yourself gently as well. Rest if you need to, and avoid activities that might impact your wound.

  • Choose your beverages carefully

Hot drinks can loosen the clot protecting the wounded area, and alcohol, caffeine, and carbonation also put your healing at risk. Water is a safe choice not only for healing, but for keeping hydrated.

  • Think about your diet

Stick to soft foods for the first day or so and chew on the side opposite your extraction site. Foods which can lodge in the teeth, like peanuts, popcorn, nuts, and seeds, should be avoided completely.

  • Watch for symptoms of dry socket

How do you know if you have a dry socket? Monitor your pain and the appearance of the site after the extraction. For the first few days, you might feel some pain in the immediate area. Pain that intensifies after three or four days is usually not a result of the extraction. An unpleasant odor or taste in your mouth could be a sign of dry socket. You might look in the mirror and notice that the clot is no longer there, or appears to have been dislodged. If any of these symptoms occur, call Virginia Beach, VA at once. If you are experiencing dry socket, the extraction site will need to be cleaned and protected from further injury.

Dry socket is a relatively rare occurrence, but if you have any symptoms that concern you, we want to hear about them. Dr. Ford and Dr. Guter will work with you to make your extraction treatment go as smoothly as possible. Talk to us about your concerns before any oral surgery, and we will provide detailed information for the procedure and for the healing process afterward. Keep us in the loop as you recuperate, and we will work together to make your recovery a speedy one.

2875 Sabre St #260
Virginia Beach, VA 23452
(757) 499-6886

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